Your Challenges

I am pretty well known for taking on a challenge.  Whether than be a 30 day blogging challenge, or a great big mountain to get to the top of, I like to push my boundaries and find out what I’m capable of.  I hope that what I do not only gives me a buzz, but goes on to inspire other people, just like you too.

Do you like to challenge yourself?  Or do you shy away from the thought of taking on new things, especially those that scare you?

The reality is our modern lives put so many restraints on us, restraints on our time, energy, enthusiasm, self belief, inspiration…… One of the key things that can stop you taking on a challenge is fear.  Fear that one, or more, of these restraints will stop you achieving what you set out to do. So today I’m hoping to encourage you to push through the fear, and take on a new challenge anyway.

Breakthrough 

As you may already know, I host events that help to boost self-confidence and connection,  these allow participants to take part in some amazing activities, including fire walking, standing at the rooftop of North Africa for International Women’s Day, even breaking arrows with their throats.  It enables then to look fear right in the face, and step on through. However, the opportunity to take part in these types of events does not come along every day, and sometimes we all need to remind ourselves of what fear really is, and how easy it can be to overcome.  So what are some things you can do when you’re at home on your sofa, or at work at your desk, when you need to regain your self-belief and overcome a controlling fear you have? Here are my tips…….

 How To Push Through Fear

 

  1. Make a ‘worst case scenario’ list – although fear is a healthy emotion that is designed to keep us safe, the reality is that most of the things that fuel our fears are far from life threatening.  Make a list of the worst possible thing that could happen, maybe you’d get in trouble with your boss (but would you lose your job?). Maybe you’d feel embarrassed if you fail at something you’d like to achieve (but will you lose any friends over it?).  Often our fears are out of proportion with what could actually go wrong.
  2. Break the fear down – If your fear is preventing you from taking on a challenge that you’d really like to be able to take on, then maybe consider breaking the challenge down into smaller chunks.  If you want to drop 3 dress sizes, maybe you could start with having healthy dinners at least 3 times a week. If you want to run a marathon for charity, perhaps there’s a local 5k or 10k run you could sign up for.
  3. Get naked – Ok, so maybe this isn’t one for at your desk, but by stepping out of your comfort zone in some way you start to recognise your own ability to do just that.  You may feel uncomfortable at first, but this is about challenging yourself and realising that you are in control AND by putting yourself in a vulnerable situation (such as nudity) you begin to realise that, even in you vulnerability, you’re a strong and powerful individual.
  4. Choose your tribe – This could appear on nearly every list of ‘how to’s’ I write about.  The reality is that if you surround yourself with people that doubt your abilities, mock you rather than support you, or tell you you’re not good enough, then that’s exactly what you’ll believe.  Surrounding yourself with a tribe that want to support you, that want to encourage you to face new challenges, and believe that you have the ability to face fear head on, will build you up and leave you ready to succeed.
  5. Take on some additional support – Fears, phobias, and self-doubt can sometimes require some additional support to get through.  You might choose to see a counsellor or a coach, take part in an NLP fast phobia cure, attend a breakthrough workshop like the ones I run, or try hypnosis.  Most of these therapies and events would be able to support you, as they all assist in different ways with enabling you to reprogramme your RAS (Recticular Activating System), the part of your brain that controls your embedded reactions and behaviours.

 

PS